10 thoughts on “Canoe Design # 1

      1. That would be wonderful. As an admirer of all things water-borne, I understand your desire. Have you read John McPhee’s “Survival of the Bark Canoe”? I great read and may help spark that urge a bit further.

        D

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      2. Hi Devon, I sincerely appreciate your comments, especially since you enjoy boats. I have not read John McPhee but I have read Rushton. Love his design work. I wish to plan a couple more designs but people usually enjoy pictures and blogs. I am just one man so I am limited. Have you ever designed a canoe? Please continue to comment if you like. I enjoy talking boats. Thank you for your comments.

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      3. Hello again, John. I was not familiar with Rushton until now. Thanks for the lead. Lovely stuff. Question for you, I cannot pinpoint the inspiration behind the design of your bow and stern above. I am familiar with it, Native American to be sure, but which tradition? Next up, what do plan for the skin of this lady? At fifty eight pounds, the frame will be assuming most of the weight, no?

        I’ve never designed a canoe. I did some preliminary sketches for a sloop some 30 odd, very odd, years ago. Sadly, I can’t make a birdhouse that would stand up to the slightest breeze.

        D

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      4. Hello Devon, honestly, when I select a curve for both stems (if a double ender), I aspire to lead the mid section of the bow and aft stems further into the lead than not. I love Native American designed bows and aft stems, but as it come to traditional Native American, I add my own flair to the design. I am quite familiar with the curve I seek, yet, no real understanding knowledge of tradition. I do, however, keep a file of similar canoe designs and comparatively mix and match to my liking.

        As far as skin, I was thinking 3/16 th inch western red cedar with a potential coat of glass. I am not certain, yet.

        Thank you for discussing. I am grateful for your knowledge. Keep asking and I’ll do my best to answer. Thank you Devon!

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      5. Hi John, I never knew you could coat with glass. I am familiar with fiberglass of course. Why not marine grade poly? Either one would really bring out the flavor of the cedar methinks.

        D

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      6. Yes Devon, marine grade poly is what I used for my canoe/kayak combo years back, but you can fiberglass these babies and if done correctly looks as though the shine of wood is so grand. Setting my sights on a Haida canoe, though. They are my favorites and quite seaworthy. I’m working a design presently. Trying to determine construction methods, though.

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      7. I remember seeing a handmade wooden canoe many years back on its way to it first voyage. It was stunning. Being used to seeing the “Coleman” sort and those old bruised up aluminum jobs, seeing that and the pride of its maker was a moment to remember. Regarding the Haida canoes – durable beasts that they are, aren’t they generally of the dugout variety? That would be a lot of chiselling. One of my favorite boats is the Chesapeake Bay Skipjack, which as a design began as a dugout oyster boat. And as large enough trees became scarce, the shipwrights looked at other construction methods. Maybe some research there may help in the decision making process.

        D

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      8. Yes sir Devon I hear you loud and clear. I love the shallow sheerline of the Chesapeake Oyster boats with raised forward decks. Also the Haida to be a dugout for sure with even at that many techniques for the process. I am aspiring to traditional (or contemporary), build a strip-planked or a cold-molded type. Not exactly certain. Certainly a challenge. But I know I will not be able to discover a suitable tree for my tiny backyard. LOL. I am searching for alternative methods of construction. Thank you friend for such a delightful conversation. Keep it going, you know much. THanks.

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